Airbnb Sees 74% Surge in Overseas Family Reunions during Chinese New Year

● Across APAC, 85% of travellers planned trips with their families this Chinese New Year Season*
● Trips booked by APAC guests during Chinese New Year period are 280% longer than the average trip booked on Airbnb
● 87% of all travellers are set to travel in groups

 

Hong Kong – January 16, 2020 – Ahead of the upcoming Chinese New Year season, Airbnb, the leading diverse accommodation and experiences marketplace, reveals a surge in family travel during the holidays that will boost tourism in the region.

 

While outbound travel tends to spike during this season, this trend indicates that tradition and reunions underlie these travels. Travelers choose to travel with their loved ones this festive season as 85% of APAC travelers will embark on trips with their families during the holidays, when compared to the rest of the year. The leading choice of travel destination is overseas, with an increase in overseas travel of 74%, compared to this time last year.

 

APAC guests maximize their family reunion time as trips booked during the Chinese New Year holidays are 280% longer than the average trip. Singaporean families take the longest break as their average trip lasts for 10 days, followed by Hongkongers, who plan to take off for at least one week on average this holiday season.
The Chinese New Year feasting tradition lives on as food and drink related Experiences are the most popular for family trips in APAC during the holidays, followed by arts, nature, history and sports.

 

Hong Kongers Get Ready for a Family Adventure

 

During Chinese New Year, 87% of Hong Kongers are set to travel in groups. They prefer traveling longer in Chinese New Year with an average length of 8 days, 111% higher than the average length of stay throughout the year. Hong Kong explorers are keen to scope out other Asian cities nearby to spend their holidays. Taipei sits as the most popular destination, followed by Seoul, Osaka, Tokyo, and Bangkok. They choose to get closer to “food and drinks” on their holiday, followed by arts, nature and history activities.

 

Top 10 family-friendly Airbnb listings on travelers’ wishlist this holiday

 

Airbnb allows travellers to create a unique, memorable moment for their Chinese New Year reunion, anywhere they may be in the world, by offering a diverse array of authentic accommodations and experiences that allow them to experience cities and neighborhoods as if they lived there.

Discover the most family-friendly listings and Experiences for your next trip across the region here and in Hong Kong here.

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